About your Search

20121201
20121231
STATION
CSPAN2 157
LANGUAGE
English 157
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 157
high speed is california. we have two california members we are going to hear from and we will go into details about california's progress but having visited out there, it does only service about 100 mile stretch and mostly in a rural area without transportation interconnections that we need in mobile systems, we are serving major population centers but we will talk about plans and concerned about some of the direction of what is going on in california, plans to connect los angeles, san francisco bay area which are also traveling the reports we have on that. our intention today is really to try to work in a positive fashion to make sure high speed rail occurs in the united states. i tell people in florida, in my district and around the country that our number one goal should be, as you may know, amtrak bones, the government people own, have an interest in 600 miles of track between washington d.c. our nation's capital, philadelphia, new york city, boston, the most congested corridor in the united states of america, that is the only 600 miles that we really own. we another small st
construction in california and the obama administration's high-speed rail program. transportation secretary ray la hood testifies about the $10 billion already spent with the goal of providing 80% of americans with access to high-speed rail within 25 years. this is just over three hours. >> good morning. like to call this hearing to order. today is another one of our hearings and focused on passenger rail in the united states, and this is an oversight hearing, which we conduct at the full committee level. pleased to welcome everyone to this hearing, and this opportunity to review the progress of high-speed rail in particular today, and the title of the hearing is, an update on the high-speed rail and inner city passenger rail program, mistakes made and lessons learned is the title. the order of business is we're going to hear members' opening statements from the committee. then our first panel will actually be two members who we'll welcome and hear their commentary, both of them from kaz, -- from california, leaders in the congress, we're pleased to welcome. and then we'll have the secretary in
of the battle in california, which americans prefer to think of as a skirmish rather than a battle. other than so other than that, americans won every single battle. there were three parts of the war. in the first eight, general zachary taylor secured northern mexico with key victories, including this one at buena vista. in 1846 in the first month of 1847. the second part of the war, he traveled a lot in kansas through new mexico, all the way to california. and unfortunately, neither of these tremendous victories bring what polk wants, which is peace in the securing of california and texas into the union. mexico refuses to surrender, despite the victories. so polk decides to invade central mexico. and he bombards veracruz and travel throughcentral mexico, securing the capital in the fall of 1847. in the eyes of americans, it was sort of a poor pollution that their side would win. and win easily. most u.s. citizens harbored racist beliefs about mexican man. foremost being that they were cowardly to fight. in fact, mexican troops fought hard come, as you can see in this rare print. you can actua
? the presiding officer: the senator from california. mrs. boxer: mr. president, how much time remains on either side on this nomination? the presiding officer: 13 minutes for the majority. mrs. boxer: okay. could you let me know when i've gone four minutes because i want to save time for senator -- the presiding officer: the charity will notify. mrs. boxer: well, mr. president, i want to thank very much my colleague, senator cork, for his remarks -- colleague, senator corker, for his remarks and join in with his support for this very able person, carol galante. she has a long and distinguished career of building and promoting affordable housing and she's very well qualified. she began her career as a housing coordinator for the city of santa barbara, rising to become the city's housing and redevelopment manager. and i would point out, santa barbara is a magnificent part of my state. i have a beautiful state. and they didn't have much in the way of moderate income housing, and i think it was very important the work that she did. she moved on to eden housing, a nonprofit affordable housing develo
. the great plains and rocky mountains, west of the rocky mountains to california. it did not include california because california, as you know, was already a state. the crescent -- the question was so critical because it had to do with the feature slavery and the future of southern power in the nation. so there's demanded what they saw as their constitutional rights as american citizens to take their property, including slave property, and to territories and by the entire nation. in 1857 in the famous or infamous stretched out decision the united states supreme court affirmed the seven constitutional views. republicans, in contrast, said never. no matter the supreme court. republicans would allow no more slaves in any territory. abraham lincoln was elected in november of 1860. one month later the united states congress came into session. members of congress put forth various compromise proposals. a critical portion of all dealing with the division of the territories, most often a proposal to extend some kind of dividing line westward beyond the louisiana purchase all the way to the
, travels west from fort leavenworth in kansas through new mexico, cochrane in mexico and only california. unfortunately, neither of these tremendous victory spring what he wants, which is peace and the securing of california and texas into the american union. mexico refuses to surrender despite the victories, so he decides to send general winfield scott to invade mexico. he bombards the veracruz and travels through central mexico securing a capital in the fall of 1847. in the eyes of americans it was sort of a foreign conclusion that their side when and win easily because most are byrd a host of racist beliefs about mexican men foremost among them being that mexican and one lazy and cowardly to fight. in point of fact mexican troops fought very hard, as you can see , very few images, so it's rare when you find one. you can get a sense. mexico lost all of these battles and ultimately lost the military side of the war because they have vastly inferior weapons. their leader was terrible. mexico's government was in turmoil. there were broke. there were various panels were there was no money
. this is bill manbo. this is the photographer. bill manbo was born in riverside, california in 19 away. american citizen of course, was born in the united states and under the 14th amendment a citizen by birth. he went to hollywood high school. he was in the class of 1921 at hollywood high, went off to the frank wiggins trade school to study to be an auto mechanic. he graduated in 1923 and he opened up a garage in hollywood. he liked model racecars and the left cryptography. he was an amateur photographer. he also developed an alias for himself that he used at times. his name is real manbo. he developed a french version of his name but he refused. he would refer to himself as either manbo and he changed the spelling of the last name so it would be not manbo. man bio -- there's actually a photograph of disparate key is built-in for your with plywood in front of the door and arching artistically across this little entryway is the name manbo. break your heart mountain. cu is a bit of a character, no question about it. this is a lot of his family. in the middle, to older folks in the middle on the l
every few months but i made so many good friends. more there than in california. kids and family are in california. i don't know what happened. but i have not mastered the hebrew language which is a great failure of my life. i still do not want to leave. what do they think? what is said to? into israel there are 1 million kinds religious factors secular that go to synagogue and sound that want nothing to do with any of it then every degree of orthodox certain ways do tip fact or be ears. and the same is true of christians. the arab christians have a very little sense of the evangelical western christians. it is a hodgepodge. announcing very many people are a judge on there christiane your duty is some unless they are totally obnoxious. [laughter] this year among the christians that they are proselytizing are to have an ankle of armageddon. i don't know. i don't know anybody that does that. i have never known a christian to have that motivation but to bring forth the end of day i don't know anybody who does that. but people get over that. but we were just impressed with his face b
in california in may mitt romney said, quote: the president doesn't understand when you invest like that in one solar energy company, it makes it harder for solar technology generally because the scores of other entrepreneurs in the solar field suddenly lost their opportunity to get capital. who wants to put money into a solar company when the government puts half a billion into one of it choice? excellent question. and i wrote this book because we're not just spending half a billion, we're spending about $12 billion a year to make electricity more expensive rather than cheaper. that's about six billion in tax breaks and about six billion in direct expenditures. we're pursuing a vision of green jobs that makes no sense and that hurts low-income americans. we brainwash our children to think that greed is good and think uncritically about green products and green jobs. and yet we can't even define what a green job is. let's start with green jobs. the bureau of labor statistics has five definitions of the 3.1 million green jobs that it's counted. namely, energy from renewable sources, energy effic
many others migrated to california set up - churches and educational institutions and eventually became deeply involved in politics. beverley, who is a particular interest of - book founded a group called concerned women for america who still claims to be the largest women's political organizational in the united states and she based her organization on five spiritual principles in the bible the family and the patriotism the sanctity of marriage and safety of life and religious parents should have more control for example and what they're taught in school are doing that the equal rights amendment for the wedding was a violation of the fundamental orders of things and winning many of these cases. >> did you interview her for your bookracks. >> she is still in seclusion. she retired about almost 15 years ago and lives in california again. >> somebody would have liked to talk to? >> i would very much like to talk to her, and one of the things i think is really important is that an organization like hers which was so involved, so foundational to the conservative women political activism in
, and they like other southern e january jell -- evangelicals migrated to california, set up megachurchs and constitutions, and eventually became deeply involved in politics. beverley, a particular interest of mine in this book, founded a group called concerned women for america, which still claims to be the largest women's political organization in the united states, and she based her organization on five spiritual principles, the bible, the family, patriotism, the sanctity of marriage, the sanctity of life, and she began to litigate arguing that religious parents should have more control. for example, over what their children were taught in school, arguing that the era, the equal rights amendment for women, was a violation of the fundamental order of things, and winning many of these cases. >> host: did you interview her for the book? >> guest: i did not. she actually lives in seclusion now. she retired about, oh, almost 15 years ago now, and lives in california again. >> host: somebody you would have liked to talk to? >> guest: i would very much like to talk to her m one of the things
of the members of our board of trustees and the former governor of the state of california, pete wilson. governor. [applause] also with us tonight is our terrific congressman from houston guy really is retiring after 26 years. [applause] are scum her supervisor, foy. [applause] for the city who are patient enough to go through the book signing line, just prior to the event this evening coming in at this wonderful woman to see woman is here with us today. she's the best selling "new york times" best-selling author. it is a gentleman, please join me in welcoming calista gingrich. [applause] we have with us tonight a very special guest. i know that if i were simply to get the typical dinner circuit introduction speaker did newt gingrich, the one where you list every accomplishment. i promise you it he here all night and even newt would get bored. his list of achievements and politics is involvement of lifelong learning. his expertise in national security matters, business ventures, philanthropic endeavors, dozens of books he's written just the list goes on and on. allow me for the moment to present
with the exception of the battle of pain scout in california, which americans think of as skirmish rather than a battle. so that doesn't count. other than not, americans win every single battle. there were three theaters of the war. in the first stage, zachary taylor secured mexico's key that juries including the one of buena vista in the first months of 1847. the second theater of war, general stephen carney travels west from fort leavenworth in kansas to new mexico, conquering new mexico to california. that happens about the same time. neither of these tremendously to restrain what polk wants, which is peace and the securing of california and texas into the american union. mexico refuses to surrender despite the fact trees of both taylor and carney. the poked pope is jesus and winfield scott to invade central mexico. he bombards veracruz and travels through central mexico securing the capital of the fall of 1847. now in the eyes of americans, it was sort of a foregone conclusion that there sideway because most u.s. citizens harbored a host of racist police of mexican men. foremost among them
and the former governor of the state of california pete wilson. governor. [applause] [applause] our county supervisor peter floyd. peter, thank you for coming. [applause] now for those of who who were patient enough to go through the book signing line prior to the event this evening we yo know the wonderful woman is here with us tonight. she's "the new york times" best selling officer and president of gingrich productions. please join me in recognizing calista fig h -- gingrich. [applause] we have with us tonight a special guest. if i i know if i were simply to give the typical dinner circuit gingrich the one where you list every accomplishment of the speaker's bio. i promise you we would be here all night and newt would get bored. the list of achievements in politics, his involvement in life-long learning, his expertise of national security matters, his best interest, the philanthropy endeavors. the box he's written, the list goes on and on. let's presume we are well accounted with the important milestone and the life of one gingrich. i want to focus in some part on the future. and what i
of california. i lived in california. [laughter] he was once a democrat. via once bought a counterfeit watch in times square. the same thing. everybody makes mistakes. as an actor, i opposed a three-foot hairy chimp made bonzo. i worked with -- no, no, no. that was cheap. that was cheap. the only reason why i can make that joke about bob is that he is a lovable guy. [laughter] are we going to make a speech about bob? because i will. i've got nothing to do. bob is a great guy. this is on c-span and he will say why are you defending me? bob is a great guy. bob performs a service. [laughter] i should shut up. i should just quit. another thing i have in common with ronald reagan, he championed trickle-down economics. i have a weak bladder. on june 12, 19 and seven he told soviet premier gorbachev to tear down this wall. i like vodka. he calls russia rashawn evil empire. every day i called dana perino and evil person. i know you guys think she's adorable and she talks about that dog. [applause] you guys actually think jasper is a dog? that is an armenian man that she hired as an indentured servin
might grated from, say, california, texas, new mexico, because of job opportunities in arizona over the last decade or so. but that's not unlike perhaps the white population, too. it's very hard to find native arizonans. so, a lot of the people there are transplants from elsewhere and i think that explains a lot as to why the latino voters are still the sleeping giant in arizona. we saw them surge in new mexico and of course colorado and nevada, but in arizona they're still asleep some people ask why. i think in part it's because they have not established rooting, the roots in the community like in, say, california or texas. >> go into the numbers a little bit. what percentage of the population -- we heard the percentage of electorate. give us a sense of the percentage of the population, what they -- growth rate, expansion. >> in arizona, approximately one-third of the population are hispanic background. but when we take into consideration the qualifications to vote, the voting age population, only have 25% eligible to vote in terms of being over 18. but of that population, one-thir
in california and a lot of -- was it the same with slavery? was there a lot of sympathy? >> i cut its more to the point that the democratic party was probably up to the election of 1860 during the period of popular e elections for the national office with the majority party in the united states. and there was a party the was devoted to what we might call state rights and local control and we put together a coalition that included the slaveholders in the south, and a whole variety of people in the north including urban laborers and they were pushing back against the potential promise of the centralization of power. i think that is true that state rights or spread. some think the secessionism was sufficiently widespread that the lincoln administration is really worried about it. remember, california and oregon, the centers of power in the united states, this is one of the reason lincoln wanted to build the transcontinental railroad once the civil war begins because he wants to expand the reach of the federal authority there was fear that there would be a west coast -- if you think about why
in california and a lot of liberals in texas. >> guest: absolutely. >> host: was the it the same with slavery? was there a lot of sympathy to the institution of slavery in the north? >> guest: i think more to the point that the democratic party was probably, up to the election of 1860, during the period of popular elections for national office, was the majority party in the united states, and it was a party that was devoted to what we might call state rights and local control, and they put together a coalition that included slave holders in the south and a whole variety of people in the north including urban laborers who were pushing back against the potential promise of centralization of power. i think what is true is that state right sentiment was widespread. some sympathy for secessionism was sufficiently widespread that the lincoln administration was really worried about it. remember california and oregon are very far away from centers of power in the united states. this is one of the reasons that lincolnmented to build a -- lincoln wanted to build a transcontinental railroad once the civ
of housing and urban development, carol j. galante of california to be an assistant secretary of housing and urban development. the judiciary, department of justice, william joseph bare of maryland to be an assistant attorney general. the presiding officer: under the previous order, there will be 60 minutes of debate, equally divided in the usual form on the galante nomination. the presiding officer: the senator from california. mrs. boxer: as we stand here, sit here, watch what's happening, we know that there are negotiations going on to avert at least part of the fiscal cliff. and i want to say, and i've said this privately but i'll say it publicly, that i really hope our leaders can find a way out of this. i watched the president speak today and i thought as usual, he is very fair in what he said, mr. president. what he basically said is, it's the middle class that grows this economy, it's the middle class that needs to be lifted up, it's the middle class that can't afford tax hikes, and those at the very top can do just a little bit more. ates very simple point. and i just would hope
members of our board of trustees and a former governor of the state of california, pete wilson. governor. [applause] >> also with us tonight is a terrific congressman who is retiring after 26 years of terrific service and his wife. [applause] >> our ventura county supervisor, peter, thank you for coming. [applause] >> now for those of you who are patient enough to go through the book signing line just prior to the event this evening, you know this wonderful woman is here with us tonight. she's a best selling author, "new york times" best selling author and the president of gingrich production, ladies and gentlemen, please join me in welcoming callista gingrich. [applause] so we have with us tonight a very special guest. i know that if i were simply to give a difficult introduction to spend her gingrich, the one where you list every accomplishment of the speakers bio, i promise you we would be here all night and even he would get bored. [laughter] >> his list of achievements in politics, his involvement in lifelong learning, his expertise in national security matters, his business interes
it does create incredible experience for you your loved ones, we do have it available, full- california king $32.95 xi these will be very popular this morning so do not miss out on your opportunity with it is a gorgeous brown, unaccented with the ivory or the other colors we have available which is blue marlowe and white. allegra buffington this year, joining us from highgate, a beautiful pieces at amazing prices. >>guest: 3 to see you. >>guest: s time of day because a lot of people are in bed and not happy with the way the betting fils we have an opportunity for you not only to surround yourself with luxury but to have a fabric that is so easy to care for microfiber is known for durability, softness having the brush handles like peach stand up against your skin and yet taken it to the next level by adorning it but the beautiful, tone tone embroidered him only under pillowcases but on your top sheet as well. it goes all the way out around the pillowcase in the surf at a price of twoses at a store and we are selling all sizes all through california king hundred $33. my personal story
all of these sizes.twin full, king, california king, that is like the 30 and every single size twin and full already for last callhave to apologize for the and what about your bad, the what extra comfort and cushion in soft experience this is the way to do it. these hand filled mattress pad and not only do you protect the life of your matches that you did get these soft that you will laugh. ellen potter is joining us from concierge collection. floyd and we have to talk about water and stain resistant all of these but first and foremost, >>guest: this is the best selling matches pad within concierge collection and it is one of the best in kit it the reason why is it is made differently and you can see a difference and you concede that it looks like you are sitting on all of these marshmallow pillows in the loft is so generous than it does not lose its loft, machine washable and when it first came out, it did not have this feature. it has now not only thefort and build lofton said, it has peace of mind added to it because if you sleep with a past six or you have a beverage reader ki
? >> i met him at an event i did when i was working in southern california and one thing led to another. i moved back to new york. i am from new york and started working at "forbes" of the pr department. >> elizabeth ames, or practical experience, how do that that? >> i've learned a lot since "forbes." when i sat "forbes" islandwide about markets. again, i began as a journalist and worked at "businessweek" many years ago as a journalist. but when i started to work as an entrepreneur, i learned about the fact that you really need to have economic freedom to create jobs. something i learned personally. if you're obviously just getting a paycheck, you really don't understand how government can affect that firsthand. that was one of the things that led me to think this is a useful idea for a book. >> overall, philosophically, how do you see the role of government, the role of congress, the role of the president in the economy? >> basically this book raises and answers the question. we need government to create a stable environment for businesses to function and create jobs. when government
arrivals but not necessarily foreign-born but having migrated from let's say california, texas and mexico because of the drop of job in arizona on the last decade or so. that's not unlike the white population. it's very hard to find native arizonans. so a lot of people there are transplants and elsewhere. i think that explains a lot as to why the latino vote, latino voters are a sleeping giant in arizona. we saw them surging in new mexico of course, and, of course, colorado and nevada. but in arizona they are still asleep and people ask why. i think in part because they have not established the roots, the risen the community like latino populations have been, say, california or texas. >> do with the numbers a bit. what percentage of the population, what percentage of elected they made it this time around. give us a sense of the percentage of the population, the growth rates, the expansion. >> in arizona, approximately one-third of the population are hispanic background. but when we take into consideration qualifications to go, you only have 25% that are eligible to vote in terms of being
's idea and reagan thought it was a good idea she would be getting to face california that way. he liked that idea. but the biggest factor was now so many people can view it. now there were 1.8 million people for obama as inauguration four years ago. by far the biggest. they can give out all of that about 140 or 150,000 tickets and the rest of the people show up and stand there. but when it used be on the east side there were about 20,000 people who could view the actual ceremony to read and oftentimes there were a million people for the parade. >> are all of the pictures that you showed on the slides are those pictures. >> i have many pictures were not part of the slide show that were here if you take a look at the book you will see i've got more than 50 pictures in the book. >> yes? >> [inaudible] >> they do say that it costs a lot. i don't have an exact figure but i would hope they would be somewhat scaled back this time not only because of the economy but the second inauguration. by definition a second inauguration isn't quite the same importance as the first. there is no change of p
carolina or texas or southern california, and they'll see people in uniform it was true from a growing up in buffalo new york and i got my rtc scholarship in 1995 so that was a very different culture and time. it's not that long ago but 9/11 really did change so many things and i thought i wanted to be an astronaut. i thought i was going to do all these other things but i went to school between the invasions of afghanistan and iraq and i knew exact to what i was signing up for and i wanted to do it anyway. that would make me the same as young men between the age of 16 and 30, for the last 5 million years. the consequences just are not there. there is this part of the brain that has the self-preservation instinct and i was born without it. maybe all the other guys i worked with were sane and that you try to keep yourself safe. you don't want to get shot and you're not looking to get killed. it's just you are willing to put yourself there for reasons that aren't necessarily clear until you are there. so the questions you asked about somebody else decides if you live or die, those are good q
, the senator from california, the hon. dianne feinstein. >> mr. speaker, nancy pelosi, mrs. bush, harry reid, leader mcconnell, secretary of state hillary clinton and my colleagues in government this is a special day to honor a special person in a special place. for many years i have followed tragedies and victories of this uncommonly courageous and persistent woman. in 1988 she quickly rose to be the voice of democracy in burma creating the lead for democracy, elections followed in 1990 when her party won 80% but that joy turned to tragedy and the the military junta and aung san suu kyi spent 3 decades under house arrest unable to visit her dying husband. in 1996 i recall senator bill cohen approaching with senator mccain to sponsor a burma sanction bill, sanctions were put in place in 1997 and only loosened in july of this year. senator mcconnell became one of aung san suu kyi's chief advocates and we continue to work on behalf of the people of burma. in 2003 following an assassination attempt senator mcconnell and i worked to pass an important man the remains in place today, an effort to
range from multi-billion dollars high-speed rail systems like that in california to smaller projects designed to improve speed, frequency of conventional rail service. my testimony today will discuss her ongoing review of the california project. i am providing a preliminary observation on our work today, mostly related to project costs. but i will also highlight some of her, the key challenges facing this project. first baseman ongoing review, we have found that the california high-speed rail authorities cost estimate exhibits strengths and weaknesses. we evaluated the cost estimate according to geos cost guide which provides best practices for developing reliable cost estimates. we group these best practices into four broad characteristics. whether an estimate is comprehensive, accurate, well documented and credible. a sonar experience, if you -- helps reduce the risk of cost overruns, missed deadlines and unmet performance targets. overall, we found the rail authority produce generally comprehensive cost estimates, including most project lifecycle costs. however, they are not based
of workers' compensation in football. and it is a real problem. part of it is the state of california and how it is structured to take claims but the insurance companies, the point is the cost of workers' compensation for the little league, we had to go through the states and it was 1.5 times the entire compensation of the players and we had a conversation recently with national football league and if you ask them they will do you a similar problem, people think of a concussion and in herring where a player played last the whole thing and nobody objects because there are players that have been hurt but if you go back and say you want to change this guess where you end up, use end up where dr. cantu is talking about. we basically have an entire generation we have to deal with, somebody playing in the southeast conference has perhaps already occurred damage that is not going to manifest itself in 20 years. >> you were telling me the last team that employes the player is the one that picks of workers' comp. >> that is not right or wrong. that happens to be the law. >> i am interested in your con
country and it still does. they weren't going to stay in the confederacy. what about california, which in those days before the transcontinental railroad created in 1862, before the railroad, california to the united states. people walking alongside, people sailing for weeks and months around the southern tip of south america. california was eager to go its own way. secession in other words was a tiger that might bite in any direction. andrew johnson of tennessee, great unionist southerner, put it this way. if there is one division of the state, will there not be more than one? wouldn't north america soon be just as fragmented and war prone as europe lacks 33 petty governments, a little aristocracy in common citizen not being able to pass from one state to another without a passport which would result in anarchy? johnson argued that dissolution of the union was quote only be the beginning of endless war. and so near the end of 1862, with his army stalled, his cabinet on the verge of revolt, abraham lincoln took most of the week to work on his annual message to congress. something that
will report. the clerk: nominations, the judiciary. fernando m. olguin of california to be united states district judge for the central district of california. thomas m. dirk kin oun to be dit judge for the northern district of districtof illinois: the presiding officer: under the previous order, there will be 30 minutes of debate equally divided. the senator from vermont. mr. leahy: originally we had a vote planned for 5:30. if there's no objection, i would ask that the time be divided between now and 5:30 in the normal fashion and the votes be at 5:30. the presiding officer: is there objection? seeing and hearing no objection. mr. leahy: and, mr. president, i ask unanimous consent in behalf of senator inouye that karen carrington and mike hansen, leblg laiflegislative fellows do the committee on appropriations, be granted privileges of the floor during the fiscal year 2013 disaster assistance supplemental. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. leahy: and, mr. president, just so senators will know, it is my understanding the first nominee, fernando olguin of california, will be
. c-span: how did that happen? >> guest: in 1989, i moved out to california to work with condi rice, who was my outside reader on my thesis committee, partly, and also to be in the bay area, and she got a job in the bush at the first bush administration, and so i just happened to meet shultz one day and asked him if i could interview him for my research. and he'd just left the reagan administration, and he was allowing students to interview him. and so he allowed me to interview him, and it led to me working for him to do the research for his memoir. c-span: now how did condi rice become your--what?--outside of what s... >> guest: my reader. c-span: harvard? >> guest: yeah, the--an outside reader on the dissertation, but from another university. c-span: but from ucla. >> guest: no, at harvard. c-span: at harvard. ok. >> guest: yeah. she--we met just, i think, through the field. i met her at stanford and she would come to harvard and give talks, and so i thought she would be a good person to--to work with. c-span: now are you political along the way? do you have strong feelings about
. it is free to get it to their door. sent in to minnesota or california or new york. -- send we have had thousands of new shoppers in the last day and you can get more than one of these also. you can also use flex pay more than once. many times the limit per but we are not doing that here. you may want to talk in a way for graduation -- tuck. if you want to get four or five of them i do not think there is a limit. will find out whatyou could literally buy one for the and one for yourself or one for your hobby and one for you. you can put them all on flex pay. send it directly to someone who lives in new york or l.a. etc. and we will pay for the shipping. no compromises and you know very well you want a tablet and more importantly 18 brand name. in the world of tablet computers, yes you can do games in it is a lot of fun and intuitive and easy but at the the day is a little bitty and more importantly it is america's number one selling number one rated and #1 7 in. tablet computer in the world. we hope you can try it. it is going to and this is your last shot. this becomes one of those thi
am here. i think i have something in common with ronald reagan. he was governor of california. i lived in california. he was once a democrat. i once bought a counterfeit watch in times square. same thing. everybody makes mistakes. as an actor he starred oppose a three foot harry chimp named bonds so, i work with bob beckel. no, no, no, that was cheap. that was cheap. the only reason i i can make the joke about bob is he is a lovable guy. are we going to make this speech about bob? i will. i got nothing to do. i will be here all night. bob is a great guy. he will say why did you defend me? bob is a great guy. bob performs a service. i should shut up. i should just quit. another thing i have in common with ronald reagan, he championed trickle-down economics. i have a weak bladder. june 12th, 1987, he told mchale gorbachev to tear down this wall. i like vodka. he called russia an evil empire. every day i call dana trio an evil person. i know you think she's adorable and she talks about that dog. why is. you guys actually think jasper is a dog? that is an armenian man that she hired
-seller. the first call is patricia in cottonwood, california. patricia, you're on book tv. go ahead with your question or comment for neil barofsky. >> caller: yes. hi. i just wanted thank you for writing this book because has opened my eyes to exactly what happened. i remember when they were voting on this, and i was kind of screening of the tv, please don't do this. your book has made it able for me to understand how on-line level, i guess, i could say, exactly what happened, and i just thank you so much for writing this book. al was wondering if you are going to write any other books about the stimulus or anything else, you know, these big huge things that they are passing. there is anything like the ordinarily person can do to get there voice heard. >> guest: first of all, thank you. it feels great, you know, when writing a book like this. it is a challenge writing about the bailout, and one of the things that i try to do was to make it accessible and understandable. and when i had a job in washington, special inspector general, that was always part of our mantra. i used to talk it talk -
california, arizona, north carolina are all being transformed in the post-world war ii period by this historic shift in population and political influence. just think about it. really does three from 1964 to two dozen eight could be thought of as kind of the carried of sun belt dominance in american presidential history. if you think about every president elected from 1964-2008 comes from a state of the sun belt. lyndon johnson from texas, richard nixon from california, gerald ford was never elected. he was not even elected vice president. he was a michigan. jimmy carter from georgia. ronald reagan from california. first george bush, texas by a connecticut. bill clinton from arkansas, and the second bush from texas. so 2008 is in some ways a watershed election. it is this 40 year period of sun belt dominance. and there were issues that are critical in the politics that develop, that came out of the sun belt. they tended to have a conservative task to them. they tended to be oriented around history of strong national defense, of an opposition to unions and a defense of free ent
, new york, illinois, missouri, te xas, california. she would help the bank when times were bad. she was the largest individual lender to the new york city government. she lived in the gilded age when society lived lavishly but she rebelled the opulence. she loved her children and friends, lived a simple life. she was caring of those who befriended her and she would show great affection and would say because he does not know how rich i am. living her life as she deemed best to have a career and a mother to her clever investing she showed that women were the equal of any man with newspapers around the world they claimed her the queen up on wall street. and she was "the richest woman in america". there are a lot of sayings of her words of wisdom. she did have a good sense of humor. if you have any questions i would love to answer. >> do you have evidence. >> know. that they should have the right to vote. i found usually successful women like gertrude bell did not believe of women's suffrage, margaret thatcher did not, in zero gandhi they want to make their way in a man's world. >> eigh
reagan. he was governor of california. i lived in california. [laughter] he was once a democrat. i once bought a counterfeit watch from times square. same thing. everybody makes mistakes. as an actor, he starred opposed a three-foot every chance named bonzo. i worked with bob douglas. [laughter] that was cheap. that was cheap. the only reason why i can make the joke about bob is that he's a lovable guy. he would have -- yes. [laughter] are we going to make this speech about bob? because i will. i've got nothing to do. i will be on my. bob is a great guy. i'm saying this because he this is on c-span. bob, i'm defending you. bob is a great guy. bob performs a service. he -- [laughter] i should shut up. i should just quit. [laughter] another thing i've been in common with president ronald reagan, he championed trickle-down economics. i have a weak bladder. [laughter] on june 12, 1987 he told soviet premier mikhail gorbachev tear down this wall. i like about you. [laughter] -- vodka. >> he called russia and evil empire. everyday i call dana perino an evil person. do you guys actually think
this into context. he was born in san francisco in november of 1920. he grew up in california, and part of the research i went down there. those of you who ever have the opportunity to go to the museum can see materials that are there from the zumwalts including a statue and a mannequin that is really quite attractive. he graduated from the naval academy in 1942. he was in that wartime class where four years were condensed to three because it was really important to get these, to get these newly-commissioned officers out into the war. he received a bronze star for bravery in the battle of leyte gulf, and it does remind me that, i believe -- that's right, there are three, actually, in the room there are two zumwalts, but the zumwalt family which is an interesting family in its own right, but there are four generations of bronze star recipients, and two of them are in the room tonight. i think that's a particularly notable recognition for a family. bud served on destroyers -- yeah. [applause] so easy to introduce them because all the zumwalt kids are either james or elmo, they have no ori
, california is the next caller. >> it is an honor to talk to you. i met you and some years back at the conference in monterey, california and i remember the educational challenges not only to reach the masses but also to educator the children of the superrich and that the blacks on route nadir at observation the only the superrich can save us. i would like to get an update on your take of the educational challenge we face by your analysis which i think is absolutely superb. you are really a beacon of light in the darkness for us all. >> host: >> guest: education is our biggest challenge, drive economic growth and we have an educational system that works on a model developed at the university of bologna in the year 800 where a guy stands in front of a rule of 800 and talk with them. and into every classroom using video and the internet. we need to recognize and education assistance designed for an agrarian era and give kids the summer of doesn't make sense and an educational system designed for people having one career in their lives beginning when they turn 21 and extending 20 y
effort to produce high speed, they're doing it between bakersfield and fresno, california where there are very few people, their contention is long-term connected in population centers in san francisco and los angeles, but it will be a long time before that is accomplished. right now we do have the connectivity we need to, the population, and we also have the only corridor, 430 some mile corridor almost entirely unknown by amtrak, the american people and the taxpayers. that is opposed to the rest of amtrak service, 20,000 miles of service, long-distance, inner-city service, on which amtrak runs on private freight rail that is maintained and paid for on a lease basis to the private sector, and we in fact again bones this corridor and we have also highlighted -- i took the chairmanship in october of 2010, the summary of the title is the federal government must stop sitting on its assets. the first part deals with gsa and we have taken on gsa and some of the idle buildings that sat vacant. was a few minutes ago to continue the effort to get empty buildings fill. if you read through
was built in long beach, california. it was all of the funds are also subject to appropriation they're coming from the government each year, but given the scale of that being so much smaller, the investors felt comfortable that money will come. i think when you're talking about the magnitude year and the cost associate with significant delays, it raises it to a whole nother level, that's right. >> it seems to me the infrastructure of the government would have to also be changed to account for any such new and important inroads into public-private partnership forever. thank you very much. >> ms. hedlund, you said in your testament that you got the right pieces and the right people in place. do you currently have any private investment in the project? >> is there currently any private investment in the northeast corridor? >> correct. >> yes, there is. and it's in the station. as you are familiar with, the union developer, redevelopment of union station involves a significant public or private partnership with a private real estate developer. and the same is true with proposed be devel
in california. i have kids in california and family. i don't know what happened and why i'm still there, quite frankly. it's just that, i can tell you i haven't mastered the language which is one of the great failures of my life, but i still don't want to leave. but as far as what people think, first of all, you go into israel. there are million kinds of jews. there's any kind of religious sect your every kind of secular to synagogue, secular so what nothing to do with any of it. and then every degree of orthodox, certain ways of tipping the hat, certain kinds of beards. i don't know, i don't know what a monolithic jewish community is. and the same is true of christians. christian cevaer, the arab christians first of all have very little to do with evangelical western christians that go in for various reasons. it's just a hodgepodge. so what people think it is going to be what they think of you personally. i don't think very many people are judged on their christianity or judaism, unless they're just totally obnoxious. >> there's a few of those. >> definitely. i mean, the fear against christia
to have to be a big part of the budget negotiation >> host: california, independent caller. hi, daniel. you are all in the air. going once, going twice. okay, don. pennsylvania, republican caller. hello, regina. >> caller: i want to say since you brought up the social security think, it means these people aren't going to take money out of the bank and expected to be promising. i think this is a very bad program to take that money out of paychecks and social security is already bleeding. put it where it belongs. for the nations which i find that other levy said with this institute you can just go get your health care, to that man that called you can go get your health care from the subsidies. with a second. the article in the tribune reviewed can kanaby cato institute policy. >> host: we have had him on many times, regina. >> caller: he is saying it would cause california department of insurance estimates even with the subsidies roughly 25%. it's making people go away from these states where they can't afford these. how about if we go to the united nations and get them out of our budget
't say and we will get to that a little later. i will recognize the gentlewoman from california, miss eshoo for five minute. thank you. i hope we will have another round because there are a lot of questions that need to be asked. i am troubled by the claims of the public safety spectrum act is all about revenue raising. the last time i checked this is the energy and commerce committee, not the budget committee. having said that, i think we did a good job to bring about a balance, to bring about the dollars that would fund the public safety network, that we would produce dollars for deficit reduction, but again, this is the energy and commerce committee, in section 309 of the communications act explicitly prohibits the fcc from basing its auction rules predominately on the revenue that would be generated and during the bipartisan negotiations on this bill compromise was reached to allow unlicensed services to operate in the guard bands that would be created as part of the band plan which would not be auctioned. the cbo looked at the proposal that became law and concluded that the guard
as the atlantic campaign that i found evidence of dollars from as far away as california that had pictures of the alabama sinking with its bow up. i think is a powerful image and a powerful morale booster. i wanted to end by reading two things that these terrific historians have written in their books. no doubt without consulting each other. kraken writes, in the civil war i see, naval forces did not determine the outcome of the civil war. the north would have won the war even without naval supremacy. but naval forces affected its trajectory and very likely its length, and that in the end was important enough. jim mcpherson goes a little bit further, i think, in "war on the waters," and i quote, to say that the union army, the union navy won the civil war would state the case much too strongly. but it is accurate to say that the war could not have been one without the contributions of the navy. we will let you to fight it out on some future arena, but i will end officially by pointing out something we heard all about these problems that naval officers had with each other. the army, these t
. she speaks for an hour and 15 minutes at stanford university in california. [applause] >> thank you for your very generous introduction. there is no place i more delighted to be than here community of cutting edge scholars, shelley and all that you have put together. what i would like to do is add to an ongoing conversation here about what i would like to call the two flags of feminism. and in its 60s and 70s, two different aims. one was to hold up the flag of gender equality. is involved first of all the right to go to work. it is easy to remember -- it is easy to forget what we didn't have in 1960. women did not stay at work and women were largely absent in the professions. many women, in many states couldn't hold -- take out a loan from a bank in their own name. in my university, uc-berkeley at that point, three%, full professors, 8% associate professors, going to the male faculty club and all the photographs, very august looking men, if you blow the horn you couldn't be in the cow band for example in 1960. put your arm away. so since that time and also women earn $0.60 to every
and i said i know she's written five best seller books and she's out in california so i call her up and she says the invited me to give that stock and i said what are you talking about i've written five best-selling books and i went to georgetown, georgetown is better than the holy cross, so i hung up on her. i didn't call anybody else, but i am very happy that i was chosen it was an honor to be back at this institution and i want to thank you the congressman mcgovern. that was also a joke. i made that up. [laughter] the congressman and the fact i had the honor of being with that george mcgovern speak of 90th birthday party a number of months ago and where is the congressman governor? with no relationship to george mcgovern spoke very eloquently of senator mcgovern's life and he followed him and he spoke beautifully about what it meant to be an american and what it meant to make a commitment to this company in times of war as he did in world war ii but also in times of peace so i want to thank the congressman for coming. does anyone know where allen ran off to but i want to think he
that is very special week do not do ground deliveries. >>host: vertigo to california real joanna believe it is 3:00 a.m. and up morning she has to be excited when a welcome joanne welcome to hsn and thank you for getting up early with us. good morning. >>caller: hi intelliwhite purchases cake lester microcurrent melded to me by fax at i got it smudged up and i did not know that you guys sold it because i was so excited it was so delicious even know was a mess which still aided and we had the cheesecake it was the absolute best cheesecake i had my life. to try the other two. >>host: c13 to order today joanne? >>caller: i ordered the tiramisu andocolate trouble cakes. >>host: a luggage joanne. >>guest: thank. >>host: you enjoy it whenever you receive and they give iran. >>guest: i have a great and she is my grandmother's sister and every year she would said can i have first and i know where progress was to start opening up my guess i opened them upmuch good stuff to enjoy so i start now enjoying christmas gifts. >>host: we do something that is delivery direct an you the paper
your insta bulb get >>host: from california >>caller: just picked: thank you >>guest: >>host: thank you 1-866-376-8255 for getting you be using this for >>caller: my son and i see 16 we just moved in and the previous owners had a nice area but extra room under the stairs to make it a bigger pantry but they did not plant any light and air. i can store my extra pot and pans but i do not have to hire an electrician now or call in there with a flashlight. i can stick that out and my son does not have to electrocute himself. >>host:vanother thing that we love about this is safe. these are both on and looked at me they do not get hot. you do you know how hot a traditional like bobbie? >>caller: i do because i just changed 1 -- how a traditional light bulb is? >>host: thank you 1-866-376-8255 >>host: thank youg out so early >>caller: i have had bad elegies so i am not getting much sleep >>host: i hope you feel better. have a good day. she does move in a new who was $200 to spend on electrician? >>guest: not going to go into my attic without this. you can take this out of
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 157